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Gabbia smithii (Tate, 1882)

Diagnostic features

This species is ovate-conic to conic in shape and has fine growth lines and microscopic spiral striae are often present. An umbilicus is absent in both adults and juveniles. The only similar species in northern Australia, G. affinis, differs in its shell being more solid with fine axial rugae on all whorls and more convex whorls.

Classification

Gabbia smithii (Tate, 1882)

Class Gastropoda

Subclass Caenogastropoda

Order Littorinimorpha 

Superfamily Truncatelloidea

Family Bithyniidae

Genus Gabbia Tryon, 1865

Original nameBithinia smithii Tate, 1882. Tate, R. (1882) The land and freshwater molluscs of tropical South Australia. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia 5: 47–56 (replacement name for Bithinia australis Smith, 1882).

Type locality: Victoria River, Northern Territory.

Synonym: Bithinia tryoni Smith, 1887.

Biology and ecology

This species is commonly abundant, living on macrophytes in billabongs and lagoons on the flood plains of coastal rivers. The lack of varices in many specimens, and prominent growth rings on the operculum suggest that this species usually lives for a single year.

Distribution

Northern Queensland (Cape York and Gulf of Carpentaria) to the eastern side of the Kimberley.

Further reading

Ponder, W. F. (2003). Monograph of the Australian Bithyniidae (Caenogastropoda: Rissooidea). Zootaxa 230: 1-126.

Tate, R. (1882). The land and freshwater molluscs of tropical South Australia. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia 5: 47-56.