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'Phrantela' singularis Ponder & Clark, 1993

Diagnostic features

Readily identified by its large size, weak columellar fold and dark brown periostracum. It is somewhat similar to B. acheronensis in general shell morphology (other than the protoconch which is smooth in ‘Phrantela’ singularis) and bursal characters, but differs in shell size, columellar fold, radula characters and details of the reproductive morphology. The head-foot is unusually heavily pigmented, but in addition, the body is covered with grey to black pigment spots over much of the external surface of the visceral coil, as well as over most of the internal organs.

Classification

'Phrantela' singularis Ponder & Clark, 1993 

Class Gastropoda

Subclass Caenogastropoda

Order Littorinimorpha 

Superfamily Truncatelloidea

Family Tateidae

Genus Phrantela  Iredale, 1943

Original name: 'Phrantela' singularis Ponder & Clark, 1993 in Ponder, W. F., Clark, G. A., Miller, A. C and Toluzzi, A. (1993). On a major radiation of freshwater snails in Tasmania and eastern Victoria - a preliminary overview of the Beddomeia group (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Hydrobiidae). Invertebrate Taxonomy, 7: 501-750.

Type locality: Tributary of Giblin River, Tasmania.

Biology and ecology

This species is found in a swampy, muddy stream in scrub land. Egg capsules unknown but probably like those of another species of Phrantela; small, with single embryo, and covered in coarse sand grains. Development direct.

This species occurred together with two undescribed species of Phrantela. In weed, plant debris and on wood.

Distribution

Tributary of Giblin River, SW Tasmania.

Notes

Readily identified by its large size, weak columellar fold and dark brown periostracum. It is somewhat similar to B. acheronensis in general shell morphology (other than the protoconch which is smooth in ‘Phrantela’ singularis) and bursal characters, but differs in shell size, columellar fold, radula characters and details of the reproductive morphology.

The head-foot is unusually heavily pigmented, but in addition, the body is covered with

grey to black pigment spots over much of the external surface of the visceral coil, as well as

over most of the internal organs.

Further reading

Ponder, W. F., Clark, G. A., Miller, A. C. & Toluzzi, A. (1993). On a major radiation of freshwater snails in Tasmania and eastern Victoria: a preliminary overview of the Beddomeia group (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Hydrobiidae). Invertebrate Taxonomy 7: 501-750.