Gall mite

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Scientific name: Eriophyes gastrotrichus Nalepa

Other name:  Eriophyiid mite

 

Taxonomy 

 

Class

Arachnida

Order

Acarina

Family

Eriophyiidae

 

Economic importance

 

Gall mites rarely cause serious plant damage, but are a concern among growers because of the unsightly appearance of infested leaves. There are no reports on its impact on yield, but is a major concern in Bicol Region, Philippines.  

 

Geographical distribution

 

Philippines.

 

Damage

Galls with irregular sizes and shapes are formed on vines and leaves by injecting a chemical into plant tissues during feeding. These chemicals cause plant tissues to grow abnormally. Mites in all stages of development live inside the same gall.

Morphology

Adult. Mites are extremely small and difficult to see without magnification.  The worm-like body is about 148-160 Ám long and 46 Ám thick. It is white, cylindrical and tapers to the rear.  The entire body surface has a large number of close-set fine discontinuous lines giving the shield a wrinkled appearance. Forelegs are moderately arched and the hind legs are shaped like the foreclaw.  The abdomen has about 67 rings.

Biology

Eggs are laid within the gall; nymphs mature within the gall and the emerging adults infest new foliage.

Host range

It has also been reported on other Convolvulaceae like Ipomoae staphylina.

Detection and inspection

Presence of galls on the leaves makes it easy to diagnose the problem. 

Management

Control is not necessary but parts with unsightly galls may be removed.

References

Amalin, D.M. and Vasquez, E. A. 1993. A handbook on Philippine sweetpotato pests and their natural enemies. International Potato Center (CIP), Los Ba˝os, Philippines. 82 p.

Contributed by: Vilma Amante

Taxonomy

Economic importance

Geographical distribution

Morphology

Damage

Biology

Host range

Detection and inspection

Management

References


Galls grow on the entire leaf surface (V. Amante & E.T. Rasco, Jr.).

An adult gall mite.